Just a taste from that poisoned apple.

coelasquid:

underunderstood:

nowyoukno:

Now You Know (Source)

This is an important event in history, especially Canadian and feminist history. So I’m going to tell you more about it.
1) The shooter had been rejected from Ecole Polytechnique prior to the shooting. He blamed this on these female students, claiming that they were feminists who ruined his life.
2) In the first classroom he entered, he demanded the men leave before shooting at the women. No man attempted to stop him as they left. Take that as you will. (Later on, several men did get injured trying to stop him in the hallways.)
3) In his suicide letter, he believed that feminists were attempting to be more powerful than men, and were trying to take men’s rights away.
4) Feminists were actually blamed by some for the massacre. The line of logic was “if feminists didn’t make women’s rights an issue, Levine wouldn’t have wanted to kill feminists!” Victim blaming at its finest.
5) The mainstream news media often did not publicize the outrage from women’s groups, and often preferred those who took a calm approach. Ironic, that.
6) Despite him literally having a hit list of feminist icons in his final letter, several newscasters questioned whether or not the shooting was a sexist act, some even denying the idea outright.
8) Many memorials for the victims have been created, and rightly so; however, some prominent ones were erected in poor neighbourhoods where many Native women were killed every day in the same time period as the shooting (see: Marker of Change, Vancouver) (see: Missing Women, Vancouver). Basically, white feminism happened. 
The entire event was nothing short of a tragedy, and I recommend that everyone read up on it and the resulting aftermath. It’s… interesting to see how the media tried to turn it into a random act of violence instead of what it was (we know better now, luckily). The reactions (memorials, etc) to the deaths of these 14 White, middle class women as compared to the deaths of 60+ Native, lower class women are also “interesting” to compare. (By interesting, I mean infuriating.)

It’s also an important event because after it happened Canada was like “oh shit better expedite that whole gun control thing” and then did. I feel like this situation is so completely ignored when Americans talk about gun control, like the examples the American left always trot out are like “look at how well gun control works in Europe” and opponents say “well gun culture is completely different here you can’t just take them all away all of the sudden and expect that to work”. But Canada has a lot of guns AND regulates ownership to successfully cut down on gun crime, violence, and accidents. It was a pretty clear line of “this is a problem that requires legislation” and the necessary change was made. People grumbled a lot, but the shift happened.

coelasquid:

underunderstood:

nowyoukno:

Now You Know (Source)

This is an important event in history, especially Canadian and feminist history. So I’m going to tell you more about it.

1) The shooter had been rejected from Ecole Polytechnique prior to the shooting. He blamed this on these female students, claiming that they were feminists who ruined his life.

2) In the first classroom he entered, he demanded the men leave before shooting at the women. No man attempted to stop him as they left. Take that as you will. (Later on, several men did get injured trying to stop him in the hallways.)

3) In his suicide letter, he believed that feminists were attempting to be more powerful than men, and were trying to take men’s rights away.


4) Feminists were actually blamed by some for the massacre. The line of logic was “if feminists didn’t make women’s rights an issue, Levine wouldn’t have wanted to kill feminists!” Victim blaming at its finest.

5) The mainstream news media often did not publicize the outrage from women’s groups, and often preferred those who took a calm approach. Ironic, that.

6) Despite him literally having a hit list of feminist icons in his final letter, several newscasters questioned whether or not the shooting was a sexist act, some even denying the idea outright.

8) Many memorials for the victims have been created, and rightly so; however, some prominent ones were erected in poor neighbourhoods where many Native women were killed every day in the same time period as the shooting (see: Marker of Change, Vancouver) (see: Missing Women, Vancouver). Basically, white feminism happened. 

The entire event was nothing short of a tragedy, and I recommend that everyone read up on it and the resulting aftermath. It’s… interesting to see how the media tried to turn it into a random act of violence instead of what it was (we know better now, luckily). The reactions (memorials, etc) to the deaths of these 14 White, middle class women as compared to the deaths of 60+ Native, lower class women are also “interesting” to compare. (By interesting, I mean infuriating.)

It’s also an important event because after it happened Canada was like “oh shit better expedite that whole gun control thing” and then did. I feel like this situation is so completely ignored when Americans talk about gun control, like the examples the American left always trot out are like “look at how well gun control works in Europe” and opponents say “well gun culture is completely different here you can’t just take them all away all of the sudden and expect that to work”. But Canada has a lot of guns AND regulates ownership to successfully cut down on gun crime, violence, and accidents. It was a pretty clear line of “this is a problem that requires legislation” and the necessary change was made. People grumbled a lot, but the shift happened.

(via sweetjanesays)

chubby-bunnies:

So, I was required to do self portraits for a photo course I’m taking and that alone was a terrifying concept to me. I’m a long time photographer but I’ve never ventured into taking “real” photos of myself. In the end I’m happy with how it turned out and I think I look at myself a different way now. 
I’m a US 24/26, 19 years old, and it took me this long to realize I’m really happy with where I am. I’m engaged to someone who loves me regardless of society’s look on my size and I’m happy. So who’s complaining? 
XO,
Rachel (jabberwocky-.tumblr.com)

chubby-bunnies:

So, I was required to do self portraits for a photo course I’m taking and that alone was a terrifying concept to me. I’m a long time photographer but I’ve never ventured into taking “real” photos of myself. 

In the end I’m happy with how it turned out and I think I look at myself a different way now. 

I’m a US 24/26, 19 years old, and it took me this long to realize I’m really happy with where I am. I’m engaged to someone who loves me regardless of society’s look on my size and I’m happy. So who’s complaining? 

XO,

Rachel (jabberwocky-.tumblr.com)

(via thuridbbw)

sorayachemaly:

unwinona:

nocakeno:

campdracula5eva:

sorayachemaly:

Even little kids have a wage gap

  • Boys, on average, spend two fewer hours doing household chores per week than girls do (they play two hours more).
  • If they live in households where children are compensated for doing chores, boys make and save more money.
  • A 2009 study conducted by University of Michigan economists found a two-hour gender disparity in responsibilities per week in a study of 3,000 kids.
  • 75 percent of girls had chores, while just 65 percent of boys do
  • This disparity in chores and free time continues into adulthood all over the world. According to the Organisation of Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), men “report spending more time in activities counted as leisure than women. Gender differences in leisure time are wide across OECD countries.”
  • Year after year, studies repeatedly confirm these patterns.
  • The problems women face with unequal pay and housework duties actually start in childhood.
  • The fact that boys’ chores appear to be more profitable makes the childhood chore gap even more disturbing. Turns out, parents tend to value the work that boys do more.
  • Gender stereotypes dictate these patterns.
  • men who grow up with sisters do less housework than their spouses and are also significantly more socially conservative.

Just had to bold that bottom point there because of the amount of misogynists who claim that because they have women in their family, they can’t POSSIBLY be sexist ever.

oh my fucking god

I vividly remember all the families in my church where the grade-school boys were goofing off with toys and the girls were being handed younger babies and turned into babysitters.

Boys got to be boys, but girls had to be Moms.

Really, it ‘s a serious drag that even little girls today could answer #WithoutTheWageGapIWould

(via rapstarwife)

sailor-ramiel:

sora2522:

karenhurley:

This flower shaped confetti contains flower seeds that grow into wildflowers. It is hand made and biodegradable so it leaves no waste. Via

This is actually kinda perfect for outdoor weddings omg

casually reblogging this entire tag lol whoop

(via buttfuckbabe)

postmodernismruinedme:

sourcedumal:

sextoyconfessions:

meisterj:

Remember when Disney was all like ‘fuck how races work and homogeneous casts and couples’?

Black and white couple produce fillipino-american child. White dude is the valet. White step mother, one white step sister, one black step sister. Just a jumble, and it ought to happen again.

Some facts from imdb:

First multi-racial cast performing Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Cinderella.

Whitney Houston was producing Rodger and Hammerstein’s “Cinderella” and was to star in it until she decided that Brandy Norwood would make a better Cinderella. Brandy would not do it unless her idol Whitney took the Fairy Godmother role.

Brandy Norwood became the first African-American to play Cinderella. This version broke viewer-ship records when it debuted, and it holds the record for the bestselling video for a made for TV movie.

So fuck any noise where people say audiences don’t want to see a mixed race couple, or more people of color. This was a success from television. I still remember Brandy singing Impossible. 

That ought to happen again. Mixed race live action cast where the relationships don’t made genetic or racial sense.

This was my life when it came out…

This is my standard for diversity casting.

I think I was 7 when this came out and at first was like “I don’t understand how all these people are related” but the minute I started watching this, I was like “THIS IS THE BEST THING EVER I WANT TO BE BRANDY”.

So yeah, kids can learn shit pretty quickly when you give them diverse media.

(Source: lifeisblaq, via theovarianbarbarian)

bundere:

bundere:

DO NOT BUY A BUNNY JUST BECAUSE YOU SAW A CUTE PHOTO ON THE INTERNET!!! DO NOT BUY ANY ANIMAL JUST BECAUSE YOU SAW A CUTE PHOTO ON THE INTERNET. DO RESEARCH FIRST AND MAKE SURE YOU CAN TAKE CARE OF THAT ANIMAL. PETS ARE NOT HANDBAGS DO NOT TREAT THEM AS SUCH

This is super relevant again with Easter coming around the corner!!!

(via lilpuppygirl)

orcabetty:

emily—rugburn:

spartanrace:

On the eve of the Boston Marathon, we at Spartan Race, along with the country, pay tribute to all the victims and survivors of last year’s attack.
Pictured are athletes and citizens who lived through the events and won’t let tragedy grind them to a halt. This series shot by Robert X. Fogerty for Dear World captures the resilience of those affected that can’t be dampened. Please visit their site to learn more about these people’s stories and pay tribute. 

Boston is as strong as community as the world has. We are proud to be part of it. On Marathon Monday, we will be there and along with the rest of the world, we will be watching a city recover as one.  

My sister in law ran last year and my brother was near the finish line and next to these people when everything happened last year. She’s running again this year and I just talked to my mom on the phone who said my brother is really having a hard time about going back. Thinking about them and everyone else affected this week.